For My Son. Poem. Charles Bane, Jr. Spanish translation by Sacramento Roselló and Marcela Tietjen

 

I will not waiver or protest
that the wait is hard to bear;
The parent-to-be is patient
for the child he cannot see, knowing
that eternity is rounding unknown
seas to fishing nets. My
beloved, I wait. I stand upon
the beach, my arms are wide, you
must swim to the sound of me
and lights undreamed. We shall be
coins of sides alike and sleep together
in the shade. You are the growing
length of me that lays
upon a floor of leaves
and says, there is no end to light
or closing of the day. There are only
clarions that pierce the dark
with mirror songs like these.
 
 

Para mi hijo
 

No renunciaré ni me quejaré
de que la espera es difícil de soportar;
El futuro padre es paciente
ante el hijo que no puede ver, sabiendo
que la eternidad rodea de
mares desconocidos las redes. Querido
mío, yo espero. Estoy de pie
en la playa, mis brazos extendidos,
debes nadar hacia el sonido que emito
y hacia las luces inimaginadas. Seremos
como monedas de caras similares y dormiremos juntos
en la sombra. Tú eres una extensión creciente de mi
que yace
en una manta de hojas
y dice, no hay fin para la luz
ni se acaba el día. Hay solo clarines
que penetran la oscuridad
con canciones especulares.
 

Spanish translation by Sacramento Roselló and Marcela Tietjen
 

Photo: Charles Bane Jr. with his son. Credit: Capehart Studio
Charles Bane & Son

Charles Bane, Jr. is the author of The Chapbook ( Curbside Splendor, 2011) and Love Poems ( Aldrich Press, 2014). The Huffington Post described his work as “not only standing on the shoulders of giants, but shrinking them.” A contributor to The Gutenberg Project, he is a current nominee as Poet Laureate of Florida.

 

robin@artvilla & http://www.facebook.com/PoetryLifeTimes

Griefs Home. Poem. Amparo Arrospide

 

Perhaps grief is a home
with a haughty ceiling and a bolted door
where you feel so comfortable, sometimes,
that you do not hear the steel s edge
slashing the tapestries,
suspended on the scented air:
it is heliotrope blended with brimstone,
seeking to settle in the corners;

only the window stands
between the limit and you.

Arduous walk, in silence you listen to the ancient voices,
firewood for this grief
always starved of you,
as demanding as a newborn child
whom you already love.

The door opens ajar and you close it:
There is nothing to be afraid of.

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Amparo Arrospide (Argentina) is a Spanish poet and translator. She has published four poetry collections, Mosaicos bajo la hiedra, Alucinación en dos actos y algunos poemas, Pañuelos de usar y tirar and Presencia en el Misterio as well as poems, short stories and articles on literary and film criticism in anthologies and both national and foreign magazines. She has received numerous awards. Together with Robin Ouzman Hislop, she worked as co-editor of Poetry Life and Times, an E-zine.

The Hunter (Villanelle).Poem. Amparo Arrospide

Fear, a throbbing fear, as fiercely white
as the forest snow I roam while all sleep,
And over my tracking boots there was moonlight
Over my drunken steps, only her orbit

As white as anguished snow and the forked path
to the castle where my fate had been decreed:
“You will bring me her heart”
And looked at the moving distaff turn
–her face I couldn’t  see, perhaps abominable–
And over my tracking boots there was moonlight
Over my drunken steps, only her orbit

How pale the child was, her heart in throbbing fear
As Snow melted away for wolves and dens,
The forest snow I roam while all sleep,
And over my defeat now only moonlight
And over my drunken steps, only her orbit

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Amparo Arrospide (Argentina) is a Spanish poet and translator. She has published four poetry collections, Mosaicos bajo la hiedra, Alucinación en dos actos y algunos poemas, Pañuelos de usar y tirar and Presencia en el Misterio as well as poems, short stories and articles on literary and film criticism in anthologies and both national and foreign magazines. She has received numerous awards. Together with Robin Ouzman Hislop, she worked as co-editor of Poetry Life and Times, an E-zine.