Vermeer – Private life of a Masterpiece


The techniques used by Vermeer include Camera Obscura” and using chalk popped lines to create perfect perspective. The particular work The Art of Painting” is of particular interest historically and is covered as it passes into Nazi hands in World War 2.


vermeer techniques Vermeer   Private life of a Masterpiece
the art vermeer Vermeer   Private life of a Masterpiece


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Ruthenium, “Periodic Table of Poetry” poem by Chicago poet Janet Kuypers


Ruthenium

Janet Kuypers
BlnukVECEAAVwdA Ruthenium, “Periodic Table of Poetry” poem by Chicago poet Janet Kuypers
from the “Periodic Table of Poetry”” series (#44, Ru)
7/14/13

IÙve looked for something
that would pique my interest,
the palladium bored me,
platinum was too expensive
because it was often so rare,
but then I looked around
and thatÙs when I discovered you.

I mean, there didnÙt seem to be
much of a use for you,
I even heard that a metals company
even offered 100 grams of you
free to aspiring researchers
(hoping that someone
one day may find a use for you)…

Organometallic chemistry experts
were even trying to give you away.

Well, sure, chemists used you —
they mixed you with whatever
they could find, just to see
what you might possibly create.

(Kind of like a bartender,
trying to come up with
the perfect cocktail, they
could mix for decades…)

but IÙve looked into it,
and youÙre a cheap dull grey,
probably something
IÙd find at a Walmart…

I know, I said I was looking
for something to pique my interest,
and though you come around cheaply,
youÙre still harder to find.
IÙll keep looking for something
to pique my interest,
and who knows, maybe
one day
people will find just the right niche,
and youÙll be just what I need.


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Lucky Hat Day Poem by Robin Ouzman Hislop


Exit Retford Railway Station Lincsonshire Circa 2008v. 300x225 Lucky Hat Day Poem by Robin Ouzman Hislop
Lucky Hat Day.

A sleepy bulldozer carves out the hillside,
a place for tomorrow,
what follows on, the jungle & the forest are without,
we live in glass gardens
shooting down stars. & in spite of the fact
of public hygiene there will be hunting
on Sunday.

What follows on …. is …. & so on.

Man cannot live on myth alone,
he shall earn his soil somehow, between
the Big Bang & the Big Slam …. there will be -
but not so fast …. for reasons unknown

All will become, a display
copy after copy, variation after variation, so it goes
on & so on …. that which follows
on.

A biological field in outer galactic space,
the world is their toilet they shall not want.

The world is a patchwork quilt
stitched up to the hilt its seams;
& we quarter it in our dreams
upon which our edifice is built

Where mind is a bobbing float
tugged on a rushing stream;
& beneath the skin & bone
a ceiling sky mirrors dream

Into a discrete ensemble,
time’s arrow smelts in quicksilver;
& we the emergent, tremble
extended from alpha to omega

Of man in short, …. of man in brief,
what will he think next, after all ?

A computer brain at the end of time,
Omega Man.

Pack, the near infinite,
(in – the moment before you munch.)
take a bit of the biscuit
before the Big Crunch,
it’s an eternal packet
& having all, what’s next?

***

After David Deutch. The Fabric of Reality

you may also like Robin’s Laminations in Lacquer Poem at our new Poetry Life and Times. Robin is now our editor & admin at editor@artvilla.com & robin@artvilla.com and you can also visit our Face Book sites at www.facebook.com/Artvilla.com & www.facebook.com/PoetryLifeTimes


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Rocky Island from Seaton Sluice beach, a Watercolor by Norman Tween


Rocky Island from Seaton by Norman Tween 1024x752 Rocky Island from Seaton Sluice beach, a Watercolor by Norman Tween

Rocky Island from Seaton Sluice beach autumn 07. Sitting on an old WW2 tank trap to daub this colour sketch.

This “sketch” has perfect tone and is reminds me of Van Gogh is the construction of the buildings and the layers of the landscape itself. The distant figures are Pissaro-like tiny sketches. It’s a beautiful scene which has more in it, a glimpse of art itself.


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