Book Release.E.M.Schorb Reviews Next Arrivals. Collected Poems by Robin Ouzman Hislop.

NEXT ARRIVALS
by
E.M. Schorb

    “Simplify, simplify,” wrote Thoreau, and we get Einstein’s formula E=MC2 . Some might say that Einstein had simplified the immense complexities of the universe in a manner that Thoreau would approve.
    To the uninitiated, Mister Hislop’s Next Arrivals might seem unduly complex; but it is the absolute opposite of complex. This epic poem—for it is not a book of poems—it is an epic of time and space, of variable time and elastic space.
    We mustn’t look at this poem flat on, as we might when we look at Milton’s “Paradise Lost,” like a map. Milton fills in his spaces. Spaces are the subject of Mister Hislop’s Next Arrivals; the electric universe and its interstices. We are singing the body electric with Whitman, but in a different way. We are singing the universe, its mysterious nooks and crannies, and to sing it, as Mister Hislop does, we must see it through all the points of the compass at once, and we must see it between those points. Think a wheel with spokes: the author suggests that there is something important between the spokes, something that must be felt and found, perhaps a final reality, and as we fill in these interstices, the parts of the poem almost miraculously clamp together.
  •           life decieves the disobedience of art
  •           plunged into never waking obsession
      the play is yet in flux

    a crowd of events jostling for a place amidst the shambling shadows

(p. 55)

There is a handful of the stuff between the spokes. These metaphorical shadows are also real spaces. We cannot make similes because we do not understand what is there, but we have no doubt of the crowds in space and time. They cry for attention. They beg for notice. Mister Hislop is attentive. He listens. He attends. He is a poet.

    •           vast unoccupied
        regions of outer space
    •           night wrapped up in immutable energy
        a silicon chip may stay put there for eternity in infinity
        or blip
        to be resurrected on a google bandwidth

(P.75)

Patches of words are spaced in such a way as to suggest what is next—the Next Arrivals—and there they are—what is in the spaces. Next Arrivals is a space epic, not science fiction, but a silicon epic of the spaces, what is in there and out there in language and reality. But an epic must have movement, narrative; and what we are advised to read is the narrative of digital tapping. There is no past, no future, now is the moment and we are actually in flight!

    Tap! Gluon! Tap!
    It makes one wonder if we have produced a machine or rather if we are, if the universe is, the product of an even greater machine, and if, ultimately, some kind of god, a deus ex machina, may emerge from the machine and solve the tragedy we all live—I’ll call it “The Tragedy of the Trees.” Mister Hislop makes us feel this almost supernatural—let us say ontological—journey. This is a brilliant poem, and we must thank the author for it.

Amazon.com Robin Ouzman Hislop Author’s Page

Amazon.com. Next Arrivals.Collected Poems Robin Ouzman Hislop

Amazon.co.uk. Next Arrivals. Collected Poems Robin Ouzman Hislop

Schorb’s work has appeared widely in such journals as The Yale Review, The Southern Review, The Virginia Quarterly Review, The Chicago Review, The Sewanee Review, The American Scholar, and The Hudson Review.
At the Frankfurt Book Fair in 2000, his novel, Paradise Square, was the winner of the Grand Prize for fiction from the International eBook Award Foundation, and later, A Portable Chaos won the Eric Hoffer Award for Fiction in 2004.
Schorb has received fellowships from the Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center and the North Carolina Arts Council; grants from the Ludwig Vogelstein Foundation, the Carnegie Fund, Robert Rauschenberg & Change, Inc. (for drawings), and The Dramatists Guild, among others. He is a member of the Academy of American Poets, and the Poetry Society of America.

Editors Note: See also introduction to Next Arrivals by Ian Irvine Hobson at Poetry Life & Times, Artvilla.com & Motherbird.com

Ian Irvine (Hobson) is an Australian based, British born, poet/lyricist, fiction writer, journal editor, and writing and creative arts academic. His work has been published extensively, including in a number of national anthologies, e.g. Best Australian Poetry and Agenda’s special Contemporary Australian Poets edition. He has published four books and has co-edited over 20 publications including 7 editions of the groundbreaking international literary ezine The Animist (1998-2001), as well as Scintillae 2012 (a print anthology containing work by over 60 Australian poets and writers). Ian has taught in the creative and professional writing programme at Bendigo Kangan Institute since 1999. He also lectures casually in a similar program at Victoria University, Melbourne.

Robin Ouzman Hislop is Editor of Poetry Life and Times his publications include All the Babble of the Souk and Cartoon Molecules collected poems and Key of Mist the recently published Tesserae translations from Spanish poets Guadalupe Grande and Carmen Crespo visit Aquillrelle.com/Author Robin Ouzman Hislop about author. See Robin performing his work Performance (University of Leeds)

Aquillrelle’s Best. Anthology of Poetry. Press Release

 

Aquillrelle’s Best Anthology of Poetry
How do you pack 61 poets in between 2 covers and keep the result mesmerizingly interesting? Simple. You just pack 61 poets in between 2 covers. Oh, yes, you also make sure their styles are as unexpected and as incoherent as an orchestra tuning its musical instruments. Oh, yes, you also make sure their art’s beauty is as unexpected and as coherent as a flock of starlings dancing in the sky. Oh, yes, sure, you also make sure the mix of the proposition is as unexpected and as varied as the space between the 2 covers allows regarding gender, nationality, sexual orientation, origins, language (translated of course), religion, age, profession, experience… and so on and on and on. Oh. Yes. You also do not forget the voice of those who lost their voice forever and ensure it lives on. Forever.

The paper nugget you are holding in your hands is worth its number of pages in ounces of gold. Probably more. Numerous poets included in it have been nominated-for/shortlisted-in/finalists-at/recognized-by and, of course, won a large number of high-profile high-quality writing prizes, titles, honorable mentions and awards on national and international schemes. A far from exhaustive list of which includes: National Women Hall of Fame membership, Zoetrope All Story contest, Gilbert Theater competition, Virginia Library Association Poetry Book award, Robert Frost Foundation Annual Poetry award, Alabama State Poetry Society Book of the Year, History Book Club Essay contest, Erbacce-Press Poetry award, Pushcart Prize, Vailero Prize for poetry, Pulitzer Prize, Unicef Short Story award, Bridport Prize, Sidney Booktown International Poetry contest, Petra Kenny International Poetry competition, White Pine Press Poetry Prize, CAA National Prize for literature, San Gabriel Valley Poetry Festival Chapbook competition, Ballymaloe International Poetry Prize, Library of Virginia Nonfiction award, Westport Arts Festival Poetry competition, Mario Luzi Prize.
The number of journals, magazines, anthologies and books carrying these poets’ art counts in the hundreds. Who are they? Professors, teachers, musicians, scientists, students, housewives, bricklayers, journalists… poets. All of them.
Thank you, poets.

Aquillrelle’s Best: this anthology contains 4 chapters with poets that were selected in: 1 – Reader’s Choice (http://www.aquillrelle.com/readerschoice.htm ); 2 – Poet of the Month (http://www.aquillrelle.com/pom.htm ): 3 – Contest Winners (http://www.aquillrelle.com/past%20winners.htm ); 4 – In Memoriam (for several of our members and friends who, oh so sadly, passed away). This book will also be sent to an “independent-publishers” contest.

Poets Appearing in Aquillrelle’s Best: Abhishek Dua, Albert Russo, Alisa Velaj, Anastasia Nikolis, Andrew Campbell-Kearsey, Carolyn Moore, Charles Banks Jr., Chaz Gee, Chris G. Vaillancourt, Cindi Silva, Daniela Raimondi, Dorothy and Mark Johnson, Earl LeClaire, Elijah Guo, Ellaraine Lockie, Fahredin Shehu, Frank Steenson, George Amabile, Gloria MacKay, Godson Osarenren, Holly Spencer, Hugh Lawrence Monro Wyles, Jack Trammell, Jane Kingshill, Jaye Tomas, Jeff Walt, Jessica Livermore, Jinn Bug, John Mc Guckin, Joseph Adkins, Joseph Hesch, Joy Leftow, Karen Powell, Kristina Monroe, Linda Mills, Lynn Veach Sadler, M. Lee Alexander, Magda Karavageli, Marc Creamore, Marsha Berry, Matlyn Peracca, Nicolette van der Walt, Paul McMahon, R. L. Kurtz, Raj Shekhar Sen, Rinzu Rajan, Robert Gibbons, Robin Ouzman Hislop, Romi Jain, Sadiqullah Khan, Shigufta Hena Uzma, Stefy Janeva, Sullivan the Poet, Tavius Dyer, Tom Berman, Tyler Drescher, Udita Garg, W. Jude Aher, Wanda Lea Brayton, William Fraker, Zayra Yves.

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