Wasn’t It | by Seymour Shubin

Wasn’t It?

I remember, when I was a kid,
hearing that if you wanted to be anything
in medicine or any of the sciences
you had to go to Germany
you had to study there.
But it was of no interest to me
since I was just a kid.
But it came back to me
like a blow
when some months later
I saw a man sitting in what was
described in the newspaper
as a Jew in a garbage wagon
being paraded by what were called
brownshirts.
But that was just an ugliness,
I remember thinking.
After all, that was the world
of the sciences,
wasn’t it?
What could ever happen there?

Why Me17501379

Barbara Brett‘s review

Aug 22, 13
Read in August, 2013

 

“A poem…begins as a lump in the throat, a sense of wrong, a homesickness, a lovesickness…. It finds the thought and the thought finds the words,” Robert Frost wrote nearly a century ago. The words are as true today as they were then, and they are a particularly apt description of the forty gems in Seymour Shubin’s eloquent and moving poetry collection, Why Me?. This is the first time that Shubin, best-selling author of crime fiction, has turned his hand and his heart to poetry, and it is as close as he has ever come to autobiography. Every poem opens a window on a thought, a longing, an incident that though unique to the poet also shines a light on the life of the reader and awakens the warmth of recognition in his or her heart. From the poignant “Wait Your Turn” that opens the collection to the heart-rending “Joel” that ends it, the book is a journey of discovery for its author and of rediscovery for his readers. Why Me? Shubin asks, wondering why he is still here when so many other loved ones have gone before him. But every reader of this book comes away with the answer: “It’s because we need the insight and wisdom you give us in this beautiful book, Seymour Shubin—and we long for more.”
Posted in art music poetry, Seymour Shubin
Seymour Shubin
Seymour Shubin is the author of fifteen novels and more articles and short stories than he can begin to remember. His novels and stories have won numerous awards. 'The Captain', received the Edgar Allan Poe Special Award from Mystery Writers of America, and was also the subject of an essay in 100 Great Detectives. Another of his novels, 'Anyone's My Name', a New York Times' bestseller, and has been used as a text in university criminology courses. His short stories have appeared in a wide range of publications, ranging from such popular magazines as Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine to the literary Story and Potpourri, where one of his stories won the best-of-year award. A collection of sixteen of Shubin's tales were collected in 'Lonely No More', which was released in 2012. Other stories have been anthologized, and one of Shubin's stories -- 'The Cry of a Violin' -- was broadcast twice on the BBC, whilst 'The Good and The Dead' was collected onto six CDs by Books in Motion. His one nonfiction book was a commissioned biography of John B. Amos, the late founder of the insurance giant, AFLAC. Shubin was born and raised in Philadelphia, PA and is a graduate of Temple University. He and his wife, Gloria, live in one of the suburbs. They have two married children. His son, Neil Shubin, wrote the paleontology book 'Your Inner Fish'... which was shortlisted for the Royal Society Prize for Science Books in 2009.