From A to B. A Poem by Robin Ouzman Hislop


From chaos to drift,
the inhuman landscape,
snatches of music,
ensnared in the fiction,
the inescapable illusion of our being.
 
The dream returns,
half remembered, half forgotten,
False flick, false form, but falseness close to kin,
From the rubble of artifice,
The wreckage of the day long gone,
But things must go their own way
Reborn as myth from the commotion its left,
Beyond our control,
Where humans must enact their fate
From chaos to drift.
 
From A to B
stomping between being
it is what it is not
& is not what it is,

the big arsed hairless baboon
from what it’s left to what it will be
A to B the myth of it’s morality,
the memory of what it’s forgotten,
what it should be, at play with the day.
 
A to B, in the transit shift of the scene,
closes the world where we belong,
without belonging in it all,
at that point beyond fiction,
the nothingness which is everything.
 
Notes towards a supreme fiction. Wallace Stevens.(italics mine)
Being and Nothingness. John Paul Sartre.(italics mine)

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Poems of Pablo Neruda

Pablo_Neruda_Ricardo_Reyes

Pablo_Neruda
 
 
I am not an expert on the works of the late Chilean poet Pablo Neruda. He is regarded by some as one of the greatest Latin American Romantic poets of the 20th Century. An insightful commentary can be found in Forest Gander, whose critically acclaimed translations of the Chilean Nobel Laureate appear in The Essential Neruda. Selected Poems. 2004.
 
My own view is that a great deal of myth mongering surrounding his name due to his political beliefs and sudden death just after the Pinochet coup, may contribute considerably to his present fame.
 
Certain writings from the late Julieta Gomez Paz, an emiminent Argentinean eassayist, feminist critic and poet in her own right, argue that in much of Neruda’s love poems, the female role is depicted more as an object than a personality. In other words an archaic machisimo attitude is very much present in his works. An opinion that i am not altogether unsympathetic towards.
(Robin Ouzman Hislop)
 
 


 
 
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Core. A Sonnet by Robin Ouzman Hislop.

 
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This tumble down day of tears and clay.
And though stood still, I do not stand in awe
At the world’s throng of life given over,
As I gaze across black hills rolling grey
Turbulent clouds on the darkening land
Reaching the peninsula of my eye,
its sudden scene, its solitary strand,
My thoughts of time, existence, shadow, myth.
 
By myth we’ve become a shrouded life’s lie.
Prisoners we’ve fled before from what we are,
Conscious of being conscious, language & death.
 
But we know not more of self and choice, our
Law has contained us in our right to life,
As monstrous now as the world before us.

 
 


Robin Ouzman Hislop Editor of the 12 year running on line monthly poetry journal Poetry Life & Times. (See also its Wikipedia entry at Poetry Life and Times). He has made many appearances over the last years in the quarterly journals Canadian Zen Haiku, including In the Spotlight Winter 2010 & Sonnetto Poesia. Previously published in international magazines, his recent publications include Voices without Borders Volume 1 (USA), Cold Mountain Review, Appalachian University N Carolina, Post Hoc installed at Bank Street Arts Centre, Sheffield (UK), Uroborus Journal, 2011-2012 (Sheffield, UK), The Poetic Bond II & 111, available at The Poetic Bond and Phoenix Rising from the Ashes a recently published Anthology of Sonnets: Phoenix Rising from the Ashes. He has recently completed a volume of poetry, The World at Large, for future publication. He is currently resident in Spain engaged in poetry translation projects.

 
 
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