Kate Tempest. Performance & Page Poet.

Kate Tempest (born Kate Esther Calvert, 22 December 1985) is an English poet, spoken word artist and playwright. In 2013 she won the Ted Hughes Award for her work Brand New Ancients.
 
Kate Tempest 1
 
Tempest first performed when she was 16, at open mic nights at Deal Real, a small hip hop store on Carnaby Street in London’s West End. She went on to support acts such as John Cooper Clarke, Billy Bragg, Benjamin Zephaniah and Scroobius Pip. She toured Europe, Australia and America with her band ‘Sound of Rum’ and worked with organisations such as Yale university, the BBC, Apples and Snakes, The Old Vic and the Royal Shakespeare Company. Tempest has performed at such venues as the Glastonbury Festival, Latitude, The Wandering Word tent at Shambala, The Big Chill and the Nu-Yorican poetry café, where she won two poetry slams. Her first poetry book was Everything Speaks in its Own Way, followed by her first work of theatre, Wasted. At 26, she launched the theatrical spoken word piece Brand New Ancients at the Battersea Arts Centre (2012), to great critical acclaim.The piece also won Tempest the 2013 Off West End Award (“The Offies”) for “Best TBC Production”. Tempest’s influences include Virginia Woolf, Samuel Beckett, James Joyce, W B Yeats, William Blake, W H Auden and Wu-Tang Clan.
 
In 2014 she released the album Everybody Down (Big Dada), which was produced by Dan Carey and was nominated for the 2014 Mercury Prize.
 
No matching videos
 
 
editor@artvilla.com
robin@artvilla.com
 
www.facebook.com/PoetryLifeTimes
www.facebook.com/Artvilla.com
 

Songs of David

Songwriter David Jackson

Many more mp3 recordings are going back up tonight. Many that are in Itunes. Our little “Free Mp3″ enterprise was huge. We couldn’t give them away fast enough. Other websites streaming our material through play buttons meant that most people never actually came here to listen. That’s disconcerting to most artists but has never been much of a problem for us. It’s our secret radio.

Because of my name, david michael jackson…..
Since I put these songs back up, somebody in Tibet might ask a Russian MP3 website for Michael, and he’ll play one of my songs from the Russian site, then he’ll say, “Mikael Jakson? Yes I have heard this person.”

When we give it away it’s scattered all over the place. It is indeed good to purchase so that the material is neatly in one place. These days we’ve decided to keep selling and to also keep giving samples away. It’s the internet.
At least until Net Neutrality ends!
“When Ya’ll head out on the fast lane ya’ll might be gone fer gud.”

It’s been a hard year for me. I’ve lost good friends. I just feel like giving stuff away and all I have are my songs, poems, and art.

Dave

Seymour Shubin

Seymour-Shubin
I and we have lost a friend, brother, contributor and poet.It is with a heavy heart that we embed this page. Seymour is embedded in my heart. We published his first poems in 2011 and have rejoiced when they came.

We will not publish for one week in honor of our friend.
The last poem he sent to me was written in 2012

I have been doing this for a long time in internet time, since 1997. I have always published poems as they came in rather than have issues. When they don’t come in I write poems myself. I am the earliest example of how very close to people you can become on this thing.

You can love people
you’ve never seen,
or have seen once
on this thing.
Love them as surely as the sun
if that is sure

I have heard of this place
they call heaven.
If this man is not there
I respectfully
decline the invitation

Seymour, my friend,
they are saying your 93 years was a long life.
For me it was three years
that I knew you
and that’s just not enough
and, to me,
you died so young.

david michael jackson

Dubnium, poem from the “Periodic Table of Poetry” series by Chicgo poet Janet Kuypers

Dubnium

Janet Kuypers

from the “Periodic Table of Poetry” series (#105, Db)
(8͏23͏14)

Over the years, the U.S. and Russia
have fought over all sorts of things —
thermo-nuclear bombs,
inter-continental ballistic missiles
to carry those bombs,
even getting men into space,
or winning the most Olympic medals,
or even… Making new chemical elements.

You may think of the Cold War
when I mention the U.S. and Russia,
oh, I’m sorry, the Soviet Union,
but you could probably also think
of the Transfermium Wars
where both countries spilled a lot of

ink

in an effort to come out the winner.

Because it was both Dubna in the USSR
and Berkeley California in the U.S.A.
that claimed the discovery of this element,
but after the Cold War, the IUPAC
(oh, don’t make me spell that out for you,
the International Union of Pure
and Applied Chemistry, the group
that decides the names for elements)
said that credit for this discovery
should be shared between the two.

But if the two countries no longer
battled over who discovered it first,
they could at least then argue
over the naming rights for the element…
The Soviets wanted to call it nielsbohrium
for the Danish nuclear physicist Niels Bohr.
The Americans wanted to call it hahnium
for the late German chemist Otto Hahn.
SO, American and Western Europeans
started calling the element hahnium,
while the Soviet Union and Eastern Bloc
countries went on calling it nielsbohrium.

So the IUPAC gave the name unnilpentium
(one zero five, Unp) as a temporary name.
Though the two countries still disagreed
over the naming of this new element,
The IUPAC then decided on Dubnium,
to honor the Russian discovery location.
I think the only reason it got to be named
after Dubna is because America had
so many elements already named for them
(like berkelium, californium, americium),
and if the elements AROUND one oh five
(rutherfordium and seaborgium) are U.S.,
Dubnium can offset the American discoveries.

So yeah, even after all these decades
of competition and mistrust,
a third party had to come in — repeatedly —
to try to settle our squabbles,
kind of like the UN…

But now that we’re got the name
figured out for element one oh five,
maybe now we can learn about Dubnium,
right?
So I did a little research, and lo and behold,
scientists haven’t been able to figure
this element out either.
Melting point? Unknown.
Boiling point? Unknown.
Density? Unknown…
I guess that’s what we get
for battling with the Soviet Union
(well, okay, later Russia)
to try to create a highly radioactive metal
which doesn’t even occur in nature.
Only a few atoms have ever been made,
so I guess our “creation”
is for research interest only.

…But wait a minute, we just created
a radioactive element — should we worry
that if this spreads we’ll turn
into a radioactive planet?
Will our progenitors
be a radioactive species?

Well, that might sound like a thrill
for comic book guy, but Dubnium
is so unstable that it would decompose
so quickly that it’ll never affect humans.
And because of Dubnium’s half life
of half a minute (that’s short, by the way),
there’s no point in even worrying
about it’s affects on the environment either.
So as I said, sorry comic book guy,
but this won’t turn us
into radioactive people
or kill us by radiation…
Hmmm, maybe the United States
and Russia once worked
on trying to blow each other up
with nuclear bombs and missiles,
but when it came to the Dubnium battles
in the Transfermium Wars, maybe for once
we were both working at the same time
on something for science
that will only help us learn.